Laguna Art Museum

Juxtapoz Magazine In the Land of Retinal Delights: The Juxtapoz Factor was an exhibition that presented the work of 150 artists and posited that there has been a huge, but unacknowledged art movement taking place in this country for the last 40 years. Since 1994, this ground swelling of lowbrow, surrealistic, pop, figurative, narrative work has coalesced and found a voice in the pages of Juxtapoz magazine published in San Francisco. This rag has become the most widely read art magazine in the US. It is an influencing force on the aspiring artists of Generation Y and the Millennials, who are now enrolling in art schools in numbers never seen before. 
Juxtapoz magazine was founded by Los Angeles-artist Robert Williams. The Juxtapoz aesthetic or lowbrow art is almost always figurative, and is inspired by movies, TV, advertising, black-velvet painting, psychedelic posters, pulp porn, sci-fi and horror, carnival art, comics books...

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Weatherspoon Art Museum

The term “Latin American,” is far from homogenous: It moves across and beyond borders that are geographical, social, cultural, and aesthetic TRANSactions: Contemporary Latin American and Latino Art is the most extensive and significant exhibition of this material ever presented in North Carolina. It is also the first to look closely at the connections between Latinos working in the United States and artists from Latin America. The exhibition features the work of more than forty highly acclaimed artists working over the last two decades; they hail from the U.S., Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Venezuela, Argentina, Guatemala, and Cuba. Their artwork, like the term “Latin American,” is far from homogenous: It moves across and beyond borders that are geographical, social, cultural, and aesthetic. Diversity and hybridity are the defining characteristics of the art and artists included in TRANSactions. For example, María Fernanda Cardoso's installation of artificial flowers pays homage to those who...

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Craft In America

Glass - Fantastic forms and breathtaking details Jamex de la Torre (b. 1960, Guadalajara, Mexico) is a sculptor who primarily works in glass with his brother, Einar de la Torre (b. 1963 in Guadalajara, Mexico). The brothers moved to California in 1972 and graduated from California State University Long Beach. Their work is based on their Mexican-American bi-cultural experiences, and because they use a combination of critical thinking, glass, found objects, and mixed media their work is known for being unique. Their work can be found in the collections of the Arizona State University Art Museum, Kanazu Museum of Art, and the San Diego Museum of Art. Featured Works in this Exhibit: Einar and Jamex de la Torre, William Morris, Marvin Lipofsky, Ken Peterson, Dante Marioni, Harvey Littleton, Kerry Feldman, Caleb Siemon, Edris Eckhardt, Dale Chihuly, Paul J. Stankard and Flora Mace & Joey. Virtual Glass Exhibit on view here...

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Heard Museum

De La Torre Brothers incorporate bicultural icons into their work which expresses the migratory experience and life in a border region Holy Land: Diaspora and the Desert at the Heard Museum, launches a new chapter of visual ideas in the museums long history with an exhibit of international import. Eight contemporary artists are convened who share close cultural relationships to desert concepts that engage social, geographical and psychological issues; they are members of communities that have been displaced by the impact of colonialism and post colonialism. Although each artist is of a different background, parallel experiences emerge through different artistic mediums and thinking as it focuses on current issues of nation, identity, diaspora and cultural exchange. Participating artists include Israeli artist Guy Ben-Ner, Ambreen Butt of Pakistan, Thomas Joshua Cooper, an artist of Cherokee ancestry now living in Scotland, First Nations artist from Canada, Brian Jungen, Odili Donald Odita of...

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Art in America Magazine

IMPORT / EXPORT The Borderless Baroque A traveling exhibition examines the scope and sensibility of what its curators call “post-Latin American” art. By Edward J. Sullivan Art in America, pp 39 & 40 July, 2002

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Ocho Columnas

The fruits of artifice The work of the brothers Einar and Jamex de la Torre, "Neorreliquias", is on display at the Museum of Arts Ocho Columnas Newspaper, Artists Section Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, February 2, 2002

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Periodico Mural

'Breaking' relics with glass With irreverent pieces, the brothers Einar and Jamex de la Torre inaugurate “Neorreliquias” at the Museum of Arts in Guadalajara. By Jorge Zul de la Cueva Periodico Mural, Culture Section Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, January 31, 2002

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El Informador

Neorreliquias The Chicano Baroque blown glass With “Neorreliquias”, the Museum of Arts of the University of Guadalajara began its artistic activity of the year. The exhibition, which opens tonight at 20:30, Einar and Jamex de la Torre show a series of sculptures and installations where the glass blowing and colorful are the raw material. El Informador, Arts Section Guadalajara, Jalisco, MX, January 23, 2002

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Kansas City Star

Cultural chaos erupts in brothers' art Border Culture comes to vivid life at Grand Arts By Alice Thorson Kansas City Star, Arts - A Section of Commentary and News June 3, 2001

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Grand Arts

The De la Torres' work churns with the promises and curses of vexed unions Yes is not the typical response to an either/or question, but Einar and Jamex de la Torre prefer not to exclude possibilities if they can help it. Inclusion, especially with all of its messiness and contradictions, is by far their more natural mode and a more pertinent prism through which to consider their work: Is it glass art, installation, painting, or sculpture? Yes. Are Einar and Jamex Mexican or American? Yes. Are they social critics, historians, pop artists, or conceptualists? Yes. Is their work sensationalistic or is it wise? Yes. Though the de la Torres' work doesn't literally move (with a few exceptions), neither does it stay still. It pulses with contradiction and irreverence, it careens between different cultural references, veers among different time periods, jerks from humor to condemnation to lament. It defies allegiance to...

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