Koplin Del Rio Gallery

New Work by Einar and Jamex de la Torre, Harry Gamboa Jr., Shizu Saldamando and John Valadez Five Latino artists that come from different generations, geographic conditions and cultural influences, but all with one thing in common; a commitment to artistically explore cultural artifacts that signify identity. These artifacts can be anonymous remnants from second-hand stores, found and used by Einar and Jamex de la Torre, or more personal artifacts such as the clothing, jewelry, and tattoos on the figures drawn by Shizu Saldamando, or John Valadez’s cautious use of Chicano artifacts like the low-rider car and the Virgin. Harry Gamboa Jr.’s characters in his photographs, films, and performances have become artifacts of a new Chicano culture that is being constantly (re)created through the organic evolution of Chicano artists themselves. These five artists both appropriate cultural artifacts and create new ones through their artistic vision that reflects their immersion in...

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Glazenhuis – Glass Museum

3 SOLO SHOWS at the GLAZENHUIS The Belgian glass museum GLAZENHUIS invited four internationally renowned artists for the summer exhibition 2013, entitled: 3 Solo Shows. The brothers Jamex and Einar DE LA TORRE (MX/US), Petr STANICKÝ (CZ) and Richard MEITNER (US/NL) were offered the basement floor, the ground floor and the first floor exhibition space respectively to present a 'solo show'. This exhibition will undoubtedly result in remarkable confrontations of three very different approaches to art, glass and the museum environment. Jamex and Einar DE LA TORRE will transform the grey environment into a colourful and vast spectacle imbued very liberally with references to both Mexican folk art and Flemish folklore. Possibly less zany but equally radical is Petr STANICKÝ's remarkable artistic action. Through the architectural context he creates in a simple and monumental way a singular intervention with a translucent character. Richard MEITNER creates objects with a soul, like...

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Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego

The Very Large Array aims to rethink the parameters and very shape of a permanent collection show, making an unusually large portion of the collection visible and accessible. Featuring more than one hundred artists and representing five decades of collecting, this expansive exhibition of Museum acquisitions highlights many of the region’s most beloved and accomplished artists. With two-dimensional works displayed in a salon-style installation, the white cube space at the center of the room presents focused, thematic selections, which change seasonally. In March the second rotation of the cube debuted, spotlighting artists whose work explores the politics and psychogeography of the U.S.-Mexico border. This presentation features significant, rarely seen works of installation art such as Victor Payan and Perry Vasquez’s Keep on Crossin’ (2003-05), a passionate call for crossing borders of all kinds. Also on view is the provocative and influential project Art Rebate/Arte Reembolso (1993) by David Avalos, Louis...

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Chrysler Museum of Art

The Chrysler Museum Glass Studio presents a year-long series of free exhibitions and demonstrations from internationally known artists. From September 19 - 23, 2012, Einar and Jamex de la Torre worked live in our Studio, wowing the audience with intricately detailed works of glass sculptural art. The pieces were crafted colorful bit by colorful bit, and the amount of detail in many of the pieces was a sight to behold. Active in the glass art world since the 1980s, they are well-known for assemblage style of work. They have exhibited their work in France, Japan, Canada, Germany, Venezuela, and Brazil--as well as in the U.S. and Mexico-- and their work is in the permanent collections of some of the finest glass art institutions in the world. The brothers also provided a special treat for a student field trip from a Spanish class—a demo conducted entirely en espanol. For a look...

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Tucson Museum of Art

The brothers de la Torre provoke and inspire in Arizona museum exhibition When curator Julie Sasse walked through the “Borderlandia: Cultural Topographies by Einar and Jamex de la Torre” exhibition with the artists in tow, she had a lot of notes to take to help the docents at the Tucson Museum of Art explain the work to museum visitors. With 46 pieces and three installations, many of which come from a recent exhibition of the same name at the Craft and Folk Art Museum, Sasse scribbled down Einar and Jamex de la Torre’s elaborations on the mixed-media sculptures and installations they create, including a wide array of seemingly contradictory allusions to everything from Pee-wee Herman and Carlos Castañeda, Catholicism and Aztec religious beliefs, fast food and the Vietnamese noodle soup pho, the narcotics trade and the Pennsylvania steel industry, and Ricky Martin and the Zapotec peoples in Oaxaca — to...

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The Getty Research Institute

This exhibition explores representations of Mexican archaeological objects and sites made from the Colonial era to the present. From the first moments of contact, Mexico's indigenous civilizations evoked in their European conquerors an array of unsettling emotions ranging from fascination to fear. Eradicating populations, destroying monuments, suppressing native religions, and collecting and classifying cultural objects were among the methods used for containing and framing native cultures. Pre-Columbian Mexico, real and imagined, became the subject of innumerable books, treatises, and images. Each iteration assigned new meanings and contributed to the ever-evolving construction of ancient Mexico. The objects in this exhibition were created over the past five centuries by explorers, archaeologists, and artists who have in one way or another used Mexico's Pre-Columbian past as a vehicle for their journeys. Each object is informed by the time and place in which it was made. None are pure reflections of the sites or...

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CAFAM – Craft & Folk Art Museum

“We’re very comfortable with the baroque and quite uninterested in minimalism.” Tired of plain vanilla? Come face to face with extravagant mix-media sculptures layered with glowing color, diverse cultures and acerbic social commentary created by internationally celebrated artists, Einar and Jamex de la Torre at CAFAM. Opening on September 26, 2010, Borderlandia: Cultural Topography by Einar and Jamex de la Torre offers an eye-popping study of the terrain at the periphery of USA and Mexico. Conjuring up a vivid multi-polar world, the brothers create large-scale glass sculptures loaded with geopolitics and wit. Informed by their own cross-cultural encounters, the brother’s works are a visual and intellectual hybrid. Realized through the brothers’ collaboration, Borderlandia presents a fearless depiction of life and art on the fringe. Vivid imagery presented in a satirical and engaging manner boldly tackles issues of cultural duality and the melting pot of Southern California. Each sculpture is an...

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William Traver Gallery

As usual, the sculptures that use bravura glass techniques are the best. For their second solo show at William Traver in Seattle, the de la Torre brothers, Einar and Jamex, expanded their mixed-media assemblage/installation work into an extraordinarily varied array of objects. Some resembled shrines while one work, La Reconquista (2010), uses lenticular film print paper to create an illusionistic triptych about the clash between Spaniards, indigenous Mexicans, and popular culture. Former California State University, Long Beach students, the pair toy with art-historical conventions, gleefully dragging them down to the level of elaborate carnival sideshow souvenirs, as in New Jersey Naco (2007), Pilchuck Maiden (2007), and Mitosis (2008). The biggest, Trotsky's Dream (2010), alludes to the exiled Bolshevik's stay in Mexico City where he was assassinated in 1940. Complete with signature spectacles and goatee, de la Torre's revolutionary is swept up in a complex world of ancient Mayan mythology far...

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MACLA – Movimiento de Arte y Cultura Latino Americana

At MACLA, the De la Torre brothers blow glass and minds with a mashup of conquerors and conquered THE MEXICAN-American artist/brother team of Einar and Jamex de la Torre use blown glass in ways that would appall the guild members at the Murano or Steuben factories. With bravura technique and a wicked sense of humor, they fuse sensuous fat rolls and globs of colored glass and assemble them into comic grotesqueries. Not stopping with glass, the de la Torres freely mix and mismatch plastic flotsam and pop-culture detritus into their impish figures. Working with symbols both potent and denatured, they satirize the whole dubious enterprise of globalization as practiced for 500 years, from the first encounter at the point of a lance between Old World and New to the 21st century's homogenized but still hypercharged cross-border blend of pre-Conquest traditions and modern commercial kitsch. The whole project inextricably links multiple...

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National Hispanic Center

For the de la Torre Brothers nothing - and everything - is sacred Einar and Jamex de la Torre are a two-man bi-national renaissance. While the brothers travel back and forth between National City, California and Ensenada, Mexico on a weekly basis, they have been called Mexican, American, Californian, Chicano, and Latino. Yet, their “parallel appreciation of both cultures” and personal experiences lead them to create art free of labels and feeds their desire to preserve the “survival of the possibility of doing something new.” They translate their creative passion and critical thinking into intensely collaborative, opulent and monumental blown glass “mix” media works. And, even though their art constantly addresses and questions complex issues, they love a joke, a visual pun, hidden symbols, and wordplay. For the de la Torre Brothers nothing - and everything - is sacred including politics, religion, tradition, and geographical location. Visually and socially timely,...

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